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Jarrod's lucky escape

It was a wet day at work for Jarrod, who was driving along the rugged Mount Bruce landscape when suddenly he found himself rolling down a steep, grassy hill.

It was a wet day at work for Jarrod, who was driving along the rugged Mount Bruce landscape when suddenly he found himself rolling down a steep, grassy hill. 

The car rolled five times before he was able to free himself from the vehicle, then rolled a further 100 metres down the bank, stripping away almost all panels from the vehicle.

Thankfully, his workmate who wasn’t in the ute was quick to call emergency services and a farmer nearby (an ex-paramedic) was able to perform first aid.   

“They didn’t move me because they wanted to keep my neck and back still”  

Because of the rugged landscape the Westpac Rescue Helicopter had to land 100m away from where Jarrod was. Life Flight’s team had to carry him along the wet and slippery tussock so that he could be flown immediately to hospital.   

“There was a lot going on – it was quite chaotic... I didn’t even hear the helicopter come over!”  

During this ordeal, Jarrod was thankful to have the crew there to keep him calm.  

“There was one guy who was sitting next to me, he was really nice and making sure I was happy and okay”  

When he got to hospital with a punctured lung, cuts to the head and hip, serious bruising and coughing up blood, Jarrod was surprised that he got off with little more.    

“It was pretty horrific... but I didn’t have any broken bones”.  

One of Jarrod’s colleagues stated that “he’s an extremely lucky man”, especially when thinking back on all the people who were able to be there so quickly.  

A few months down the track, Jarrod was slowly getting back to work. He was still receiving physio for his neck, however “everything is looking pretty good”.  

Our most frequent farming missions are to quad bike incidents, With farming accidents being one of our most frequent types of call-out, and many of them happening in very rural places with limited access, it emphasises the need for a rescue helicopter service. Crewman Logan explains that “you never know what you’re going to get with a rural callout, and because it’s so far away from most services, we are usually the first on the scene”. 

“Keep up donations, because every minute counts. I didn’t expect to be rolling a ute down a hill that day, and my injuries were bad, but they could have been worse”.